sewing

Sewing for beginners. The start of a beautiful journey.

10 November, 2014

Sewing for beginners

“I wish I could learn to sew just like you!” and “Make me one of those!” are the most common responses when I show people things I’ve made. Sewing isn’t a mystical gift, you too can learn if you have the desire to do so! I’ve put together a resource pack for beginner sewers because while the internet is brimming with information, the trick is knowing where to begin, and what to look for.

Meet your machine - this is the anatomy of a sewing machine.

Meet your machine – this is the anatomy of a sewing machine.

How do I use a sewing machine?

  • Read the manual! If you bought the machine second hand, google the brand and make, people often upload scans of manuals.
  • Sewing Machine 101 – walks you through setting up your machine for the first time (or maybe even the tenth time, it takes a while to get the hang of it somehow!)
  • Learn to Sew – Tilly and the Buttons has written a lot of great posts on learning skills and trouble shooting problems. Go ahead and bookmark it – I promise you will need it!

How do I use a sewing pattern?

Sew a better garment.

Some free sewing projects for you to try.

My very messy/ productive sewing corner. Featuring my new dress form!

My very messy/ productive sewing corner. Featuring my new dress form! The machines on my desk were my grandmother’s: a Pfaff and a Bernina overlocker that are over 20 years old. I also have a newer Husqvarna that I managed to break within a year.

My top tips for beginner sewists:

  • Buy as good a machine as you can afford. Don’t be afraid of vintage machines, in fact the heavy metal sewing machines are likely more durable than the new plastic ones going for the same price.
  • Get your sewing machine serviced regularly.
  • Read the manual. I still refer to my manuals, especially for my overlocker.
  • Buy nice sewing shears. Don’t let anyone else use your shears, and don’t use them on anything except for fabric.
  • Use nice thread. Cheap thread is ok on my newer Husqvarna but my Pfaff can’t deal with it.
  • Change your needle for every 8 hours of sewing time. Use the correct needle for your fabric weight. Buy German made needles.
  • Your size in sewing patterns may not be the same as your size in ready-to-wear garments. Often it is bigger. Don’t be afraid, get out a tape measure and cut your correct size.
  • Read the instructions! So many people skip this step and when you’re starting out it may seem like a bummer but many commercial sewing patterns contain a lot of valuable instruction. You paid for the instructions, don’t just chuck them out!
  • Trace your size from the original pattern. Use tracing paper or some lightweight non-fusible interfacing. This way you can keep the multi-size pattern and run up different sizes for yourself or your friends.
  • Sew up a trial version of your garment in cheap fabric. This is called a muslin or a toile, and it’s a worthwhile endeavour if you don’t want to spoil your nice material. You can use it to alter your pattern so it fits better – just transfer the nips and tucks to your paper pattern.
  • Take the time to finish the seams in your garments nicely. Press and baste if needed. A little extra effort leads to a  better result you will be proud to wear.
  • Shop at a local fabric store with knowledgeable staff, rather than a chain store with non-sewing staff. Advice is only a question away!

Resources for plus size sewing

A huge list of plus size independent pattern designer links for plus sizes.

The Curvy Sewing Collective also has a list of patterns that offer plus sizes.

Follow Natalie’s board Plus size sewing on Pinterest.

My Pinterest board for Plus Size Sewing collects more and more links every day!

Fashion, sewing

The saga of self drafted pants.

8 November, 2014
My little avatar dreams of comfy elastic waist pegged pants with pockets. It's not too much to ask for, right?

My little avatar dreams of comfy elastic waist pegged pants with pockets. It’s not too much to ask for, right?

I have wanted some ankle length pegged/ tapered elastic waist pants with slashed pockets for ages, and I thought I might try to cobble together a pattern out of a pair of capri pants included in a McCall’s pattern I bought years ago.

Some tunics, a sundress and basic elastic shorts.

Some tunics, a sun-dress and basic elastic shorts.

So the original pattern had a tunic, a dress, and shorts; I thought the pants would work as a starting point since I couldn’t find any patterns in the books at work. I’d just peg the legs and add some pockets. Easy. Oh how foolish I was. I altered the pattern by adding a waistband casing for the elastic, since the original pattern only had a fold over elastic waist; I also added my pockets and took in the legs. Why not a fitted waist with a fly? Elastic is comfortable, and with a big tummy and no waist, regular waistbands fall down on me!

A very unattractive illustration of my first two muslins. The top two is the first attempt, and the bottom two is the second attempt.

A very unattractive illustration of my first two muslins. The top two is the first attempt, and the bottom two is the second attempt.

The first muslin allowed me to identify that the crotch depth needed shortening, the front and back crotch curves needed lengthening and I added in a full butt and full tummy adjustment. I also narrowed the legs as they were far too baggy and added a bit more to the hips.

The second muslin revealed the calves were far too tight, and the front pant piece needed to be bigger, and the back narrower. I thought I’d put more length on the front crotch curve too. Some of the drag lines I had no idea how to fix so I thought I’d just go ahead and make up my “good” pants in some lovely black cotton sateen I bought from work, and let the 3% elastane sort out a few things.

 

The lens flares disguise the many issues with these pants!

The lens flares disguise the many issues with these pants!

Here I model my new black pants. The cotton sateen unfortunately highlights all the fit issues! I'm wearing them with my purple GreenStyle Creations raglan top.

Here I model my new black pants. The cotton sateen unfortunately highlights all the fit issues! I’m wearing them with my purple GreenStyle Creations raglan top.

The back view shows that some of my fit problems are gone, but I have knee lines!

The back view shows that some of my fit problems are gone, but I have knee lines!

Right from the beginning, as I was cutting out the pants I realised that the sheen of the sateen would highlight every fitting issue. It’s probably a great fabric for more tight fitting pants, but alas I do not know how to draft them.

I am thinking of joining the Australian Sewing Guild, mostly to seek fitting advice! It’d be fantastic to be privy to the expertise of life long pattern drafters and sewists. Just think, I can walk in wearing these pants and walk out possibly possessing the knowledge to build a better pair! The internet is amazing for learning so many things, but to be able to pick the brain of a skilled person who is sitting right in front of you is invaluable.

Nick was very insistent I stand powerfully in the middle of the driveway with my big shadow behind me! Unfortunately I couldn't help giggling.

Nick was very insistent I stand powerfully in the middle of the driveway with my big shadow behind me! Unfortunately I couldn’t help giggling.

For now I am happy to wear these pants to work, as I’d intended. Usually I wear my tops untucked, but did a little tuck for these photos.  Unfortunately the sun was blaring, my eyes were watering, and onlookers were looking while we took these photos so I’m a bit self conscious!

Our gardenias are already blooming, and they smell fantastic.

Our gardenias are already blooming, and they smell incredible.

sewing

What do a whale, a deer, an elephant, and a dachshund have in common?

31 October, 2014

…They all live in a forest on my new t-shirt.

The model wears this grey raglan tee with contrasting yellow sleeves and neck binding.

The model wears this grey-striped raglan tee with contrasting yellow sleeves and neck binding.

I came upon GreenStyle Creations Centerfield Raglan T-shirt on pinterest the other night and couldn’t get it out of my head. I had a cute as hell printed cotton knit I wanted to sew up immediately if not sooner and it was the perfect fit for this raglan sleeve tee.

My first version of the Centerfield uses this ridiculously twee animals-in-the-forest print fabric with white sleeves, binding, and breast pocket.

My first version of the Centerfield uses this ridiculously twee animals-in-the-forest print fabric with white sleeves, binding, and breast pocket. I opted for the curved hem variation on this t-shirt.

I cut the 2XL off the pattern and I didn’t make any alterations beside dropping the short sleeve length to hit just above my elbow, and adding a tiny useless but adorable pocket. To be honest, I didn’t even read the instructions… it’s a straight-forward process for those who’ve sewn with knits; this tee took less than an hour to run up using my overlocker, and a twin needle on the sewing machine for hems. The results are delightful, obviously.

The back view.

The back view.

Check out this cute pocket! Why is there a whale in the forest, hanging out with deers, elephants and a dachshund?

Check out this cute pocket! Why is there a whale in the forest, hanging out with deers, elephants and a dachshund?

An hour later I was craving a second version but my stash was almost completely out of knit fabrics. I used this purple polyester slinky knit… I have no idea what it’s properly called but it has a slight texture; I also pulled out the very last skerrick of pink paisley mesh. The mesh is difficult to work with and I could have done a rolled overlocker hem but I don’t have matching cotton. I did a little band to finish it off because it looked a bit crappy unhemmed.

My purple version of the Centerfield features mesh sleeves. I cut a straight hem a little shorter than the pattern due to fabric shortage.

My purple version of the Centerfield features mesh sleeves. I cut a straight hem a little shorter than the pattern due to fabric shortage.

The back view.

The back view.

 

GreenStyle Creations “Centerfield Raglan T-shirt” –  in a nutshell.

 

Changes made to pattern

  • Added pocket, and dropped short sleeve length on print tee.
  • Added a banded sleeve hem on purple tee.

Pros:

  • Huge size range!
  • Great length.
  • Curved or straight hem options.
  • Sleeve length options.
  • A quick sew.
  • Will make again, over and over.

Cons:

  • It’s killing me every time I have to write center instead of centre!

 

sewing

Everyday Elegance.

29 October, 2014

I recently got a job in my favourite local fabric store which has driven me into a frenzy of inspiration but, lacking the time, I haven’t actually sewn much. This week I’m in enforced isolation due to having radioactive iodine therapy for my Graves disease, and what better time than to indulge in a bit of sewing?

Almost sensing the imminent storm of activity, my Pfaff decided to make a lot of noise so I had to put it in for a service (conveniently, my work can send machines away for service and repairs!) I almost threw a tantrum my niece would be proud of, but my mum stepped in to loan me her machine!

I’ve certainly been working it hard over the last few days running up muslins for a couple of blouse patterns bought from indie designers. The first two are from SBCC and I’m still working on them, however I can show off the third blouse, the Everyday Elegance Top, from Patterns For Pirates.

A comfortably fitting top with 3/4 sleeves and button tab, v neck and rounded collar.

A comfortably fitting top with 3/4 sleeves and button tab, v neck and rounded collar.

The xxxl size was actually two sizes too small for me, but I bought the pattern anyway and after printing and piecing it together I graded it up two sizes and did a full bust adjustment. The first version of this blouse I made in a vivid pink polyester print I bought years ago. I eked the back piece out of what was left by not cutting on the fold; fortunately the print is the same  left to right and up and down!

Front view.

My pink floral polyester Everyday Elegance blouse.

Back view.

I noted immediately upon putting it on that polyester is slightly gross to wear in Brisbane’s humidity. So this top will be worn in winter – the two week period we get here in this town to wear our long sleeves! The elbow room was also a bit mean considering the button tab restricts some movement so I added a little width to my pattern for the next version. I also planned to construct the collar and v neck a little differently to hide the messy bit of overlocking that pokes out when the collar is attached over the v neck binding.  Speaking of.. my v neck binding is terrible.

I model this white cotton Everyday Elegance shirt competently with hand on hip!

From the back. The fold above my butt probably signifies a fit issue… I will consult my copy of Fit for Real People!

Close up of my atrocious v neck binding. The collar was a beast!

For this version of the pattern I used a cotton shirting with a self stripe from the fabric stash my late grandmother gave me. She probably bought it intending to make a shirt for my grandfather! I top-stitched every seam because it just felt like I should. The cotton is beautiful to wear, and I will be test driving it at work on Saturday. There’s no air conditioning in the shop and if the current weather keeps up we’ll have a fair challenge for this here blouse.

I completely stuffed up the collar construction by sewing in the interfacing in the wrong order, and I only realised after I’d clipped the seam allowance. Halfway through unpicking it I realised it’d be easier to just cut a new collar. When I got to the sleeves I realised I’d cut two right sleeves due to laying out the pieces to avoid a flaw in the fabric. The self stripe looks different either side and I wanted to make sure the whole garment was made with the same stripe so I went back and cut a new left sleeve because growing an extra right arm is slightly beyond my capabilities…

Front view of the white cotton blouse as modelled by my brick wall.

Back view.

Despite my slightly wonky collar and annoyingly wrinkled hem I’m proud of this shirt! I haven’t made one in a very long time, and I wanted to make sure I finished it nicely enough to wear to work. Even though it has some flaws, it’s nice to be able to wear things I’ve made at my job in a fabric store!

 

My handmade ice cream shoes!

OH! I wanted to show off my nearly finished self made ice cream shoes! I just have to varnish them to protect the acrylic paint. I bought a pair of cheap wide fitting flats from Yours Clothing that were a patent cream vinyl; after spraying with adhesive I just painted straight on to them and chucked some bugle beads on the toes for sprinkles! I have no idea if they’ll hold up to even casual wearing but they’re cute as heck.

 

Patterns for Pirates “Everyday Elegance Top” – in a nutshell.

 

Changes made to pattern:

  • Graded up two sizes.
  • Full bust adjustment.
  • Deepened v neck.
  • Added width to sleeve at elbow length.
  • Dropped armscye front and back, didn’t alter sleeve as it has gathers.
  • Turned and top-stitched v neck binding after collar was attached.

Cons

  • Sizing doesn’t go up high enough.
  • The collar is a bit fiddly.
  • Instructions could be clearer.

Pros

  • Nice casual shirt that transforms based on fabric choice.
  • Will be making it again.
Art

Art and music – January 2014

1 February, 2014

Most of my time has been consumed with making new tiaras for Fancy Lady Industries, but I’ve done a couple of drawings and practiced a lot of uke.

A tiara that looks like short flowers made up of green crystals and vintage sequins accented with crystal points.

A tiara that looks like short flowers made up of green crystals and vintage sequins accented with crystal points.


A tiara with five curved arcs, wrapped with small hematite cubes and accented with five crystal points.

A tiara with five curved arcs, wrapped with small hematite cubes and accented with five crystal points.

A watercolour and ink illustration depicting a fat white woman with brown hair holding a pink flower reflected in the style of a Queen card in a deck of cards. A banner entwined with leaves and some twigs  are in the background framing the vertically reflected figure.

A watercolour and ink illustration depicting a fat white woman with brown hair holding a pink flower reflected in the style of a Queen card in a deck of cards. A banner entwined with leaves and some twigs are in the background framing the vertically reflected figure.


A watercolour and ink illustration depicting 12 identical naked fat white women with brown hair, all draped/ piled on the central figure who looks exasperated.

A watercolour and ink illustration depicting 12 identical naked fat white women with brown hair, all draped/ piled on the central figure who looks exasperated.


A few of my pieces are on Society6 now if you are interested in prints.


I’ve been recording myself playing and singing every few days and posting them on you tube so I can track my progress throughout the year. This is At Seventeen, by Janis Ian. There’s a few more on my channel, if you’re interested!

Body Image

I didn’t come here for the cutesy body shaming images.

31 January, 2014

People seem to have this weird barrier between digital and non-digital life. Naively, the general consensus is that life away from the screen is “real life”, as if what you do on the internet doesn’t count. Online bullying has serious consequences and I think bullies carry on abusing people because they don’t consider themselves bullies if they do so via a keyboard. Employers admit that people aren’t hired on the basis of their public social media profiles, and crowd-sourcing campaigns have the power to significantly change someone’s life. Real life is digital life too.

So my beef today should not be dismissed as “Internet stuff” because it closely mimics the interactions women have with each other in face to face socialising; and while it is certainly not bullying or overt discrimination it contributes to a culture of feminised body shame. I follow a couple of fabric stores on facebook, hoping to be the first to hear about a bargain, however most of the time my feed is full of “cutesy” images about dieting and exercise that make me want to see if I can run my iPhone through my own sewing machine.

"A smile is the most beautiful curve on a woman's body."

“A smile is the most beautiful curve on a woman’s body.”

"Calories (noun) Tiny creatures that live in your closet and sew your clothes a little bit tighter every night."

“Calories (noun) Tiny creatures that live in your closet and sew your clothes a little bit tighter every night.”

"Who you callin' a fat quarter?"

“Who you callin’ a fat quarter?”

I run my own pages, and I’m the first to admit my community building is pretty non-existent, but I absolutely abhor online community building targeted at women that leans heavily on the body, and how flawed it apparently is. Instead of building rapport with audiences about your products, inspiration and projects it seems the easy way out is to fall back on that time-honoured feminine adhesive: how to be skinnier, or at least look it. In my own life I refuse to engage in this topic with family and friends, and it’s really bloody hard to feel part of a group when you cut out body-snarking conversation filler.

It goes from “this food is just empty calories” to “god she looks like an anorexic velociraptor!” and all of it serves to redirect your focus away from meaningful living towards how desirable you can make your body, presumably for men considering the hetero-centric culture we live within. Facebook page owners continue this distraction seamlessly via humorous images that have us chortling “oh carbs, you fiends!” and hitting like.

I prefer to see actual products, the ways people have used them, inspirational photos relating to the topic of interest and most of all, discounts and special offers. Coming back to fabrics, and sewing as a skill, how is it that there is a lack of material to discuss on a page for a fabric shop? There’s a truly immense field of techniques to learn, with a rich history reaching back thousands of years. When people reduce sewing to a mere women’s past time it raises my ire, and conflating it with de rigueur body shaming hits not just angry buttons but shame switches too.

Just tell me what you sell and how useful it will be to me, and I won’t unlike your page.

Art, Blog Stuff

Where have you been?

1 October, 2013

“I just noticed you haven’t been blogging!”
At the risk of indulging in some navel gazing and completely turning away those of you who hadn’t already written me off, I thought I might make a low key comeback by interrogating myself and asking why I haven’t been blogging.

When I wrote about fatshion blogging and the sticky web it is weaving with brand partnerships and how it is mirroring fashion in mainstream media, I got a lot of flack. People didn’t want to have these tough questions put to them and accused me of ruining the fun, personally insulting them, and being a no-fun hack. It wasn’t a particularly enjoyable experience and I gained little from it. I don’t even think fatshion bloggers paid much attention at all, because at this stage I still see that pretty much every blogger, even the ones just starting out, are going for brand appeal. In my mind, success as a blogger was breaking through to mainstream media and increasing my audience, and the way to do that was to participate in a culture I did not agree with – ergo I could never be successful as a blogger.

My decision to drop the sponsorship and advertising meant far less content. My financial situation meant far fewer new purchases, and in turn my outfit posts dropped as well. At the same time, I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and put on medication; as easy as it is to say that the medication affected my ability to write, I can’t fully pin the blame there. We bought a house, and that meant even more financial struggle. My focus changed to figuring out how to make money as a person with disabilities, and a person who has self-taught skills and a fairly rigid set of values. (I am, if not anti-capitalist, definitely a doubting capitalist.) I wasn’t going to get a book deal from blogging because I was saying things people didn’t really want to hear, my audience was dwindling, and I’m not actually a very good or disciplined writer.

Watercolour self portrait of myself posing and taking a selfie with my phone. Hand drawn text says "Selfie princess".

Watercolour self portrait of myself taking a selfie with my phone while looking insecure and posing. Hand drawn text says “Selfie princess”.


A watercolour and ink self portrait as I beam rays of coloured lights from my eyes. The background is very heavily patterned with doodles.

A watercolour and ink self portrait of me staring ambiguously, beaming rays of coloured lights from my eyes. The background is very heavily patterned with doodles.


After five years of focusing on fine art, I decided to review my situation. No one was buying my original art because it was too expensive for the small circle of really lovely people who populate my audience, and I was struggling with the gallery system due to a lack of social skills and ongoing mental health problems. If no one has ever destroyed the troubled artist trope for you before, please allow me to do it now. Mental illness is a barrier to success in the art world. There are a number of artists who deal with illness and have found success but by far, the majority do not ever get there. So I needed to reconfigure my product and tailor it to my lifestyle. I already had Fancy Lady Industries so it seemed natural to expand! And for the last year that has been exactly what I’ve been focusing on.

Running Fancy Lady Industries has been full time and then some. I sketch, design, trial, produce, and put all the products together; I document my processes; I take product photos and write descriptions; I run the shop; I pack orders; and Nick and I promote on social media. I’ve been able to develop my stock and my business on my terms, and it is incredibly fulfilling and meaningful work.

Three Instagram photos of a decorated plate saying "Full as a goog"; a self portrait of myself making a fairly unattractive face; a sketchbook page with a drawing of a naked me playing ukulele and text saying "My mascara isn't waterproof".

Instagram photos of a decorated plate saying “Full as a goog”; a self portrait of myself making a fairly unattractive face; a sketchbook page with a drawing of a naked me playing ukulele and text saying “My mascara isn’t waterproof”.


Three Instagram photos of my niece Emmerson; my lilac/ pink ukulele; earrings and other accessories I made for Fancy Lady Industries.

Three instagram photos: my niece Emmerson; my lilac/ pink ukulele; earrings and other accessories I made for Fancy Lady Industries.


Oh but I have had time for other things that aren’t especially interesting on a former fatshion blog! I’ve been taking care of my brain, playing ukulele, sewing, gardening and decorating my house. I’ve been drawing and painting as well, but for me, rather than for ~fine art~. I document all of this on Instagram and Twitter, and see little reason to repeat myself on this blog.

I’m still trying to figure out where definatalie.com fits in. I don’t write as much anymore because I have lots of stuff to do, but I have also lost a lot of concentration and word-finding ability on Lamotrigine (the med I take for bipolar). I don’t believe I need to shut down the blog because I hate the idea of never writing again, or never posting another photo of myself wearing clothes. I still believe representation of fat bodies is important! This will never be a daily content blog in the foreseeable future, because I see little value in an obligatory blogging schedule when I have naught to say. You will see me now and then when I have something I need to elaborate on. That’s the value of blogging in the current sphere of social media. You get my quick quips on Twitter, off the cuff snaps on Instagram, largely unedited rants and other things I like on Tumblr, but here on my blog you will be able to consume something longer, and a little more considered. (But probably still kind of inflammatory/ provocative/ charming?)

For Sale

Shop the fance

4 September, 2013

Message in a Bottle necklace. Text: More Fance than ever.

Message in a Bottle necklace. Text: More Fance than ever.


Where have I been? What have I been doing? These are questions you might be asking. Heck, I’ve been asking that of myself! I’ve actually sequestered myself in my study making lots of things, far from human contact (not really). Last night I launched the biggest update of Fancy Lady Industries in history and I figured, “hey why not tell people about it?” Obviously my social/ marketing skills are a bit rusty.

Gem Powa bangle - frosted purple sandwiched between baby pink laser cut acrylic. Also available in black and gold glitter.

Gem Powa bangle – frosted purple sandwiched between baby pink laser cut acrylic. Also available in black and gold glitter.

Sweet'n Creepy pins - small printed plywood pins: tooth, finger bun, slime crystal and flamingo.

Sweet’n Creepy pins – small printed plywood pins: tooth, finger bun, slime crystal and flamingo.

Crystal Powa necklace - Baby pink laser cut acrylic crystal facets on top of frosted purple pendant, on a long black chain. Also available in black and mirror, and black and gold glitter.

Crystal Powa necklace – Baby pink laser cut acrylic crystal facets on top of frosted purple pendant, on a long black chain. Also available in black and mirror, and black and gold glitter.

Sweet Heart earrings - Black acrylic hearts with mint bow charms dangle from hook earrings. Also available in frosted purple and assorted colour bows.

Sweet Heart earrings – Black acrylic hearts with mint bow charms dangle from hook earrings. Also available in frosted purple and assorted colour bows.

I'm wearing a green Third Eye necklace in a very sassy manner.

I’m wearing a green Third Eye necklace in a very sassy manner.


I hope you’ll come by the shop and check out what I’ve been busy doing!

fancyladyindustries.com

Art

New drawings about gems and myself.

22 May, 2013
Watercolour and ink illustration of a fat brown-skinned babe wearing gems all over her top half and red bow suspended stockings. Crystals in puddles of pink frosting are on the ground while aqua bubbles float in the air as she makes a bubble.

Watercolour and ink illustration of a fat brown babe wearing gems all over their top half and red bow suspended stockings. Crystals in puddles of pink frosting are on the ground while aqua bubbles float in the air as our hero makes a bubble.

Watercolour and ink illustration of a cluster of nine of my heads all making different facial expressions.

Watercolour and ink illustration of 9 of my own heads all making different facial expressions.

Watercolour and ink illustration of a fat white-skinned babe with gems on her chest, legs open to reveal shining crystals and a long lilac plait that twists around a mint stockinged leg.

Watercolour and ink illustration of a fat babe with gems on their chest, legs open to reveal shining crystals and a long lilac plait that twists around a mint stockinged leg.

Watercolour and ink illustration of two of my heads, the left making an exaggerated expression of disgust, the right looking off to the side with a blank expression.

Watercolour and ink illustration of two of my heads, the left making an exaggerated expression of disgust, the right looking off to the side with a blank expression.

I don’t have many words about these, I guess that’s why I draw pictures!

Art, Craft

Cool new stuff for all you people.

16 May, 2013

Claim your gold glitter fat necklace in the presale - until May 29

Claim your gold glitter fat necklace in the presale – until May 29


I’ve been busy giving Fancy Lady Industries a complete overhaul, tinkering with its innermost workings and fine tuning the whole shebang so I can bring you new stuff in different ways. The most electrifying development amongst a cast of thrills is GOLD GLITTER fat necklaces! I’m running a presale for this limited edition of the fat necklace until May 29, so go get one.

Detail of my finished version of the Not Your Pin Up embroidery pattern.

Detail of my finished version of the Not Your Pin Up embroidery pattern.

The Fancy Babe paper doll is available as a PDF download. Print, snip, dress!

The Fancy Babe paper doll is available as a PDF download. Print, snip, dress!


While you’re over at the new shop, you might notice there’s a bunch of new things and some of them are available IMMEDIATELY! I’ve designed three embroidery patterns with a distinctly political flavour; each pdf comes with stitch suggestions and diagrams of common stitches so even if you’re new to needle work you can start with confidence. Fancy Babe is the first of a line of printable paper dolls and comes with clothes, hair and shoes so you can mix it up in your cubicle at work.

One of ten unique gem powa art card designs.

One of ten unique gem powa art card designs.


You want more? Ok! You know how I love to doodle when I really shouldn’t? I’ve decided to doodle on cards so you can keep one for yourself or send it to a nice person with lovely words inside it. The current bunch of art cards have bright gem powa designs and are named after cute minerals from the earth.

Burgundy vinyl collar embellished with hand stitched "Fat Doll" and studs.

Burgundy vinyl collar embellished with hand stitched “Fat Doll” and studs.


The last item I’m proud to show you is one of the collars I’ve made. This “Fat Doll” collar is made from burgundy vinyl and backed with felt; I’ve drafted this especially for people with bigger shoulders and necks. It’s a beautiful hand made art piece to embellish your carefully curated fatshion wardrobe.


Go browse the fance
and don’t forget about pre-ordering your gold glitter fat necklace!