Fashion

Kicking around 90s style (and something special for you!)

19 August, 2010

Photo of me posing for an outfit photo, wearing a black dress, pale blue tights, grey boots and a blue sparkly cardigan.
Lately I’ve been feeling 90s fashion, probably because I follow Tavi’s Tumblr and she’s discovering all the awesome third wave/ riot girl stuff from last decade. I don’t know about you but I wore a lot of slip dresses, cardigans and boots in the 90s; I was a teenager and I didn’t have any money to spend on clothes so I made or thrifted a lot of what I wore. I went to the Valley Markets and bought slip dresses and layered them all over each other and clomped around in my shiny black boots.

Photo of me balancing on a little ledge wearing a black dress, pale blue tights, grey boots and a blue sparkly cardigan.

Photo of my grey boots that lace up and come up to my lower calf, I'm also wearing light blue tights.
So when I bought these boots from Evans I was envisaging my own 90s revival! It’s hard for me to believe that the decade of my youth is “in vogue” again, especially when it’s just 10 years gone. Oh well, I guess I’d better get used to this aging business!

Photo of me posing for an outfit photo, wearing a black dress, pale blue tights, grey boots and a blue sparkly cardigan.
Slip – from a dress Sonya gave me
Stockings – We Love Colors
Boots – Evans
Cardigan – City Chic
Necklace – WAIT A SECOND……………..

Head and shoulders shot of me wearing a necklace that says "fat" in curly lettering cut out of acrylic.
DO YOU LIKE MY NECKLACE? I like it a lot, probably because I designed it. I asked lovely Kim from Cupcakes and Mace if she would cut it into acrylic and Kim, being lovely, did an awesome job of it.

A necklace that says "fat" in curly lettering cut out of acrylic.
Because I liked it so much I got Kim to cut a very limited number of pieces. You’ll be able to buy one for AUD$25 from my shop in a little while but first I want to give you the chance to WIN A FAT NECKLACE!

A necklace that says "fat" in curly lettering cut out of acrylic.
In order to enter the giveaway, you don’t have to follow me on Twitter or subscribe to my feed or like me on Facebook… that’s just too much hassle.

How to enter:

1. Decide if you really really like the necklace.
2. Leave a comment below with your email address.
3. Tell me a story about the time you reclaimed the word “fat”.
4. Go about your daily life wondering if I select your story as THE WINNER.
5. Wait until I announce the winner next Tuesday (August 24 2010), sometime in the (Australian) afternoon.

The giveaway is now closed and a winner has been announced! Congratulations Catie!

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  • ash

    crash [dot] russell [at] gmail [dot] com

    I’ve been fat since I was just a little kid, always taller (until about 13) and heavier than kids my age. I was constantly picked on like so many other fat people. I was fifteen the first time I finally turned outright on someone for being cruel. A kid I didn’t even know was shouting down the hall at me, “Fat asssss,” over and over again and laughing with his friends. I spun on my heel and walked up to him and said, “I’m fat. OH NO. I know it’s terrifying for you, that a girl is larger and stronger than you. But if you keep your mouth shut and learn to be a human being, maybe I’ll stop considering kicking your teeth in.”

    Not the most mature thing I’d ever said, but it was the first time I’d called myself fat. Not overweight, not heavy, not thick or husky or plus-sized or large or any of the other million euphemisms for simple fat. I haven’t gone back yet and that was more than ten years ago. I’m much happier just being able to say it! Words have immense, untapped power.

  • Veronica Ramos.

    1) Why of course I would LOVE that necklace.
    2) veronicaisfrom1990@sbcglobal.net (appropriate for the theme eh?)
    3) Well, all of my young life i’ve been associated with the word “fat.” whether it be from my family commenting on how i was bigger than my other cousins (i’m an only child so i guess they where the standards) to being in middle school and high school and having to go to the bathrooms to change for gym instead of out in the lockers with the other girls for having a fear of someone commenting on my “fat”. WELL now that my cousins have had babies and gained a bit of weight and i’m out of school and in my third year of college i’ve come to actually love my FAT. i’ve been told that i know how to “work it” fashion wise and when people ask me where i buy my clothes and it goes something like “q: where do you by your clothes? me: torrid. q: oh the fat girl store?! me: yes! the FAT GIRL STORE!!” because you know what i’m more comfortable with my curves than any size girl will ever be and i’m proud to say i’m fat and fab and that necklace will look great on any of us ladies.
    4)eeeeh, daily life.
    5) AU time and pst will destroy my sleep schedule. i look forward to this.

  • Hannah Halphen

    I reclaimed the word “fat” my sophomore year in college (last year). I am only twenty years old, but it has taken at least most of that twenty to finally be okay with my body. I was in communications class, and was given a project of starting a blog/reading a blog and reporting on how it affected me. I chose Tumblr because of the people I could follow, and I came across a Fat Acceptance blog. I read all the posts, saw all the pictures, and eventually it grew from an itch to an open wound. The open wound was me trying to figure out exactly why I hated myself so vehemently when all these gorgeous women loved their bodies. My project ended up being about Fat Acceptance, and boy do I tell you that it was hard as hell standing up and delivering my message. I ended up not only getting a standing ovation and hugs from three people in my class, but also a very well-deserved A. Brought both my self-esteem and my GPA up significantly.
    Now I go around feeling more confident in my “happy marks” instead of worrying about if my tummy roll looks offensive. I’ve also gotten more outspoken about the issues surrounding fatphobia and have even converted some friends to a new, more tolerant line of thinking.

  • Catie

    1. i really really really really really like the necklace. really.
    2. catiebat@gmail.com
    3. entering this contest is one of the biggest things i have ever done to reclaim the word “fat”. this may not be the best story, but for me just clicking on this comment box was a big first step in accepting my fucking fabulous fat. i am learning to love my body in new & radical ways, no matter what my friends or family say.

  • I read a quote from the amazing JK Rowling: ” Is ‘fat’ worse than ‘vindictive’, ‘jealous’, ‘shallow’, ‘vain’, ‘boring’ or ‘cruel’?”
    Whenever people attack me about my wait (which is fairly often), this is the one thing I always remember. The people who stoop down to someones weight are always far from perfect. Even if they are skinny, they are bound to have some flaws, especially the main one that they are obviously not a nice person. So there was no real defining moment, it’s still a work in progress to let it not affect me, but this quote is my main inspiration.

  • Eli

    1. I really really really really want that necklace. :]
    2. blackschnauzer (aaaaaaat) gmail.com
    3. There was never really ONE moment where I reclaimed the word ‘fat’. It was a long process. I started putting on weight at the time I started school. Unfortunately, this was a school where most kids were sport fanatics. So, nearly everyone was really fit. To put it short, I felt that I really stuck out, and I got quote a few remarks about it. During the next 7 years, I started to identifying myself with pro-fat feminism, even though I had probably never heard about it. One part of me wanted to be “fit”, and another part of me wanted to be happy about the way I was. I reclaimed the word, but I never said it out loud.

    When I was 14-15 I lost and gained weight for no reason. This brief time where I was almost average in size, only gave me unwanted attention from far older men. The remarks from kids at school only changed their form, from my size to my clothes. When I started gaining weight again, and the fat-comments came back, my usual reply would be something along the lines of “Why yes, thank you captain obvious.”

    Now, I am 20, and thanks to the pro-fat blogsphere, I feel good about mys size. It still bugs me though, that I can’t say the word ‘fat’ among my friends, without causing an awkward silence. Apparently, if you’re not going to use the word as criticism – you don’t use it at all. I still use it though. Not fishing for compliments, just stating the obvious. I’m fat! :D

    – Eli
    (female name by the way. Pronounced similar to Ellie)

  • kyee

    Aaah your hair! Keep that amazing-ness out of site. For while it IS amazing (clearly!), it’s hard to not buckle under the influence and chop mine off too. Everytime I decide: I’m growing it!!! I see a cut like this that has me reaching for the scissors… Lookin good! Love the necklace :)

  • AnekieBeans

    HOLY SHIT YOU ROCK!

  • Amanda

    1. i love it. im so jealous of your typographical skills.
    2. amanda.tannahill@btinternet.com
    3. i was 20 and fed up of feeling like i had to hate myself just because of one physical trait. i found a few online communities that made me feel at home with my body but ultimately it was marilyn wann and fat!so? that completely changed my brain and made me reclaim the word fat.

  • Oh man, this takes me back too! I used to wear vintage slips as dresses and tie dyed petticoats as skirts. The whole world saw my knickers. Good times. I'm not gonna enter the draw because I feel like it's OMG CHEATING 'coz I know you irl OMG. I'm gonna wait until you've got it for sale. :D

  • 1. Very much so, yes. Beyond yes.
    2. Ok… well, this is my comment that you are reading right now. Duh. Here's that email you asked for: jasievangesen@gmail.com
    3. I remember it vividly. I was working in a place that was predominantly young women who were fat and fucking hated themselves for it. I got sick of it. Sick, sick, sick. I had barely discovered FA, like seriously had read 2 or 3 pieces that had piqued my interest and my sickness of the self-hatred of my co-workers combined with that reading led me to start using fat as something other than a bad word in a really brash way. It wasn't until this last year that I grew entirely comfortable with all of it… but I made it.
    4. Agony.
    5. Squeee!

  • One day, when Natalie has an “OMG YOU KNOW ME IRL” competition we will SO BE THERE!

    -vivzilla.

    P.S Natalie, that cardigan is adorable.

  • WITH BELLS ON. FANCE BELLS.

  • I AM DANCING. RIGHT NOW. WATCH ME DANCE.

  • HOLY SHIT YOU GUYS, I was holding a secret “OMG YOU KNOW ME IRL” competition all along. YOU BOTH WON.

  • First things first I've often wondered if you do what I do when Tavi posts something on Tumblr and think, “YOU ARE 14 WHY DO YOU KNOW SO MANY UNDERGROUND THINGS FROM MY YOUTH?!” Or is that just me? :)

    I can't get over your haircut, I love it so so much

    1. I will wear the crap out of that necklace when I win it or buy it, its outrageously perfect
    2. tangledupinlace@gmail.com
    3. My mother has always referred to me using asinine euphemisms for fat. Every time I was introduced to someone she'd let them know I was her “fluffy, curvy, chunky, roly poly, etc daughter” and make a face that would let them know she wasn't okay with it and they didn't have to be either, but fuck let's just make the best of it right?? One day I just lost it and yelled, “I'M FAT, THAT'S OKAY!!! They have eyes and its not as if you're introducing your axe murderer daughter, I'm simply fat…I have black hair but you never seem to address that.” That was the end of it :) Or beginning rather!!
    4. I'll do that and also agonize over my grammatical errors, but what's new right??
    5. Its great I'm so impatient ;)

  • I love your new 'do, especially cute in your Tumblr post! I will definitely buy a necklace when available, too!

  • Hey Natalie – you look fab!

    I also wore alot of slip dresses (and floral babydoll dresses with lace-bottomed leggings) along with my stompy doc martens that my mom HATED.

    1) I do, I do
    2) feckless at the gmail dot the com
    3) i think this year has really been the year for me to reclaim it. Specifically, I've reclaimed it with my husband when he says a phrase like “I feel fat” – I'll say “me too – because I am!”. It feels really good to just use it as an adjective instead of as this negative label of not-trying-hard-enough.
    4) I already feel like a winner with one of your beautiful pieces of art headed my way :)

  • Amanda Baird

    your hair = stunner!

  • OMG – I MUST HAVE THAT NECKLACE!

    Not an amazing story, but an important one for me.

    After years (and years, and years) of my mum commenting on my weight at every possible opportunity, I recently reclaimed the word 'fat' from her, and gave myself a lesson in standing up for myself.

    My family were getting together to support my sister (a drama teacher) and her school's production for this year, and I took the opportunity to wear my amazing new top from City Chic (pink satin and black lace thank you very much) and fance it up. I rocked up and said hello to my family and my mum said 'Don't you look nice?' My response?

    “Yep – I'm fat and fancy and I love it.”

    She was a bit taken aback by the way I had put it, but I didn't care. I was fat and fancy, and I did love it.

  • bri_fatlotofgood

    OMG I covet that necklace SO bad.
    My favorite time I reclaimed the word fat is when I decided to wear my Fat! So? shirt to the gym (this was prior to owning my Definatalie Fat shirt). I got so many looks from people trying to see what my shirt said and when they realised they would sort of do a double take and then either start talking really fast about something like the weather or they would get that deer in headlights look and scurry away. I love it. I love challenging people like that!

  • Memily

    I’m with Viv and Sonya! I WANT THAT NECKLACE. Can’t wait to buy it :D

  • Sarahwhite

    Natalie, I love Tavi so much it borders on scary. Her 90's retro posts send me into raptures of nostalgia that I am getting a pair of boots like that ASAP. My docs barely made it out of the 90's and need a replacement.

    I actually had a moment of reclaiming the word FAT last week. I just found out I have a large benign fatty tissue tumour and have to have abdominal surgery to remove it. One of the things I asked was if these tumours were anyway associated with actually being a FAT person (just in a curious way). He looked a bit uncomfortable and said that he wasn't aware with it being associated with any type of lifestyle and being “FAT” was not likely to make this kind of tumour grow. I replied that I didn't mean FAT in any other way apart from describing an excess of adipose tissue.

  • Lo

    1. duh

    2. lorenlittlewood@hotmail.fr (or http://www.ourchangingsky@tumblr.com)

    3. I don't really think I can pinpoint a specific time because it was definitely a process… I wrote something recently about this and in an attempt to sum an essay up – it took a lot of red wine, Gossip songs, friends with benefits and a broken heart for me to get to the place I'm at now, but here I finally am in all of my big fat glory. I've acheived self acceptance, figured out self love and now I'm just fighting against the body politics of society. not only as a fat person, but as a queer person and a person who doesn't shave. all three of these things push at social constraints even further because I am female bodied and present myself to society as a woman. I understand and adore the concept of “fat” being used as a descriptor, rather than as a death sentence. society doesn't DESERVE anyones body justification, and I refuse to give them mine.

    4. ahhh no worries, I'll go get a beer or fifty… and then claw the computer next Tuesday….. hahahaha. at least I'm on Australian time too!

    5. :-)

  • I'm really loving your hair! It suits you so well! Oh yes, I too wore that fashion during my highschool years, I loved the pretty coloured petticoats. I think I still have my favourite, although it's a lot more tattered now.

    That necklace is FAT-tastic, and I shall be buying one when I can!!

  • I love the 90s style! Lately I’ve been wanting a pair of Docs – the new shiny red ones. they are so cute but soo very expensive. Then I see all these 13 yo kids wearing them… grrr!

    Btw not entering the comp. The necklace is totally awesome but I lose jewellry all the time so am not worthy of it!

  • 1. Your typographic style makes it impossible not to!
    3. I am currently trying to do that. Growing up as a fat kid, with a Mother who constantly crash dieted and always made it a habit to say “gosh /we’re/ getting’ so fat”, I never questioned that fat people were that way because they were terrible, lazy people (like me) who just needed to try harder. Ironically enough I was halfway through the Wesley weightloss program when I found your tumblog at the start of this year. And started to question more than just fat-hate! I was actually really impressed with myself when I recently told off a male acquaintance of mine for saying that fat fatties (deathfatties) have no self-respect because they “let themselves get that way”. Ugh :(
    4. Who isn’t always wondering if they’ve won something?

  • Magz

    I absolutely love it!
    I reclaimed the word for myself a few months ago so I’m a newbie at fatshion. I remember just waking up one morning and deciding never to put myself down again. I got up, put my very best on and smiled all day. After I had this revelation I have changed my entire wardrobe from boring “hide me” clothes to vibrant and colorful, sexy and seducing, hip and cool and all in between clothes and I have never been so happy with myself. I enjoy buying clothes and going out with my friends, something I never loved doing. Your necklace would be very happy around my neck.

    All the best
    handavinnuhjalp@gmail.com

  • Golden_read

    ooooh! just the other night, I described myself as fat (neutrally) in front of my also fat mother and aunties, It was like a needle screeching off a record player, everyone went quiet and stared. Later on I had a honest conversation with mum about weight and how our family has issues with it, I left feeling like I’d achieved a little something.
    I would LOVE that necklace, I would wear it with my tightest brightest top and a saucy little strut.

    golden_read@hotmail.com

  • Elne

    Oh my goodness!!!!!! IT IS AMAZING AND I LOVE IT!!!
    i reclaimed the word fat about two years into my recovery from anorexia. i teetered on the edge of recovery for a long time, and then i am came accross the fatosphere (first the curvature, then fatshionista, then here and several other places!) over the past six months the fat acceptance movement and the discovery of the health at every size model has made a huge impact on me. my self esteem, the way i look after my body.. yes i have fat rolls, and they are supposed to be there damnit! that is how i go.
    ellen-margaret@hotmail.com

    and if i don’t win i really want to buy one please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • AmelieWannabe

    That necklace is fantastic! Or, should I say, fat-tastic? That’s how I’ve reclaimed the word fat, by the way. If people call me chubby or healthy or curvy or plus sized, I correct them immediately by calling myself FAT-tastic. No more of this, “Oh, you have such a pretty face. If only…” Eff that! I’m fabulous and fantastic and fat-tastic all the way around.

  • Aly

    i need that necklace!

    i’ve recently gone from end-to-end on the body confidence scale. i quit hiding just this year. it started with me casually (and neutrally!) mentioning my body to my well-trained boyfriend, who would reply with “baaaaaabe.. you’re not faaaaaat!” in that same way people say “aaaawwww.. noooo…” gross.

    it kind of clicked for me. the people that love you, with good intentions, try their best to convince you that, in fact, you aren’t fat. because fat is a “bad” thing. while i’m not the biggest i know, or even in my family, i’m certainly not blind to my voluminousness at 5″6′ and a comfortable US size 16-18. i decided that it was stupid for my loved ones to try to convince me i wasn’t fat, and even dumber for trolls to try and convince me i wasn’t good enough for fashion. so?

    the next day, i donated all my black, long sleeved, knee-length things and headed to the clothing stores. the tiny and uber-fashionable girls working at the store rolled their eyes at me at first with my pile of clothes. where i usually would have been intimidated and apologizing like mad for inconveniencing them with my large self in their store, i came out of the dressing room, struck a pose in a strappy, super-short dress, and loudly said ot them, “i LOVE being fat. don’t i look amazing in this?!” at first, they nervously and uncomfortably did the “awwwwww…” thing. but i excitedly continued on about the dress and my hips and legs (that hadn’t seen air in TEN years) until even they joined in! they were going through the store with me, grabbing things off the rack and clapping and cheering on every outfit i tried on.

    that was the first time i put my importance on the same level as the smaller customers (silly, isn’t it?).. it really changed how i felt about myself, and i feel like it even changed the opinion of the store attendants, as well. their attitude was definitely different!

    now on date nights, i don’t find the most “flattering” (or slenderizing) thing to wear, i find the most attention grabbing, sexy thing i can find. and? i think in equal parts, my confidence and my body have never been so attractive. i feel amazing.

    P.S.- if this isn’t too inappropriate, the sex has never been better.

  • Alice Wyatt

    I think my most liberating moment was just a few months ago. I had to do a research paper for my English writing class. One of the topics to choose from was about obesity. Since I was in a class with people I didn’t know, I figured I’d take a chance and throw my views out there. I had so much to write! (If you remember, I sent you a copy of my paper to read back in late April or early May). Before we turned in our papers, we had to do a quick presentation for the class. I felt so comfortable talking about my fat and my health, and it was really cool to have the chance to teach my peers that fat is ok. It turned into more of a discussion, and I was glad to see so much support for the basic idea that fat =/= unhealthy.

    I’m very proud of that A. =]

  • i can’t even remember the last time i entered a giveaway, but i love love love this necklace.
    also, i freakin’ love your hair.

    ANYWAY.

    this story is actually very recent:
    this crazy rumor has started in my hometown that i’m pregnant.
    i’ve put on weight since high school (i was chubby then, full on fat now).
    finally, someone facebook messaged me about it.
    i responded with “not pregnant, just fat. :]”
    they immediately replied with a whole bunch of crap about how i was beautiful and “not fat” as if those two things are mutually exclusive.
    so i sent one final message stating that i am beautiful AND fat, and that those are just two words i can use to describe myself, nothing more.

    kiddotrue at gmail dot com

  • I LOVE the necklace! Want it! cottageschool at gmail dot com

  • THAT IS SO FREAKIN’ COOL.

    I started a thread for fat acceptance on a forum I’m on, where weight loss and thinspiration threads abounded, and I actually had some good feedback from people who were interested in the concepts of FA and HAES. It was pretty rad, and I did describe myself as fat and give a rundown on my height and weight while still proclaiming myself to be happy with my size.

    (Also, the 24th is my birthday. Just sayin’. :D)

  • Miss C

    I really love your art style overall. I am a sucker for hand-drawn, and it’s nice to know there are still illustrators out there using the paper/pencil method.

    you can get me at biggreenfeet [at] yahoo [dot] com

    I wouldn’t say there’s a single moment where I felt I reclaimed the word fat, but my fiancee and I both call each other fat all the time, which we find hilarious. I’m still relatively new to the FA experience, but I had decided long before I found the FA internet wonderland that I was going to be a positive body image role model [now AND] when I become a teacher. I want to teach high school students, and I want to show them that 1.) I am NOT ashamed of my body and 2.) I can still be a fashionable, creative individual without looking the way society expects me to. Right now I substitute teach, and I am so tickled when my elementary schoolers tell me “Miss C, you’re pretty.”

    Plus, I have a necklace thing and that necklace would go with anything and everything.

    I also just wanted to say how much I enjoy your blog in general. It’s one of my favorites to visit. Thank you!

  • SugarFemme23

    I think that necklace is adorable. How long is the chain?

    SugarFemme23@yahoo.com

    I’ve started reclaiming it at home. I haven’t used it in public yet. I tell my spouse that I’m fat, and that I’m blonde, and smart and lot’s of other things!

  • Afrotitty

    I reclaimed the word fat at my job. I work at a plus size resale boutique that has a really radical core (guess which one, haha ) and the majority of our customers have never had this kind of shopping experience. I encourage them to not try and disguise their fat under too-big and overpriced garments and to even, gasp, say the word “fat” with a positive or neutral connotation.

  • Holy guacamole, even if I don’t win that amazing necklace, I am for sure going to have to buy one from your shop! It is so excellent! As are your boots, I am totally lusting after them. I don’t know if my creddy can handle an Evans shopping spree.

    I think that my journey to reclaim fat is totally still happening. I can remember being 11, and knowing that I was fat, and walking by the science block at school and making a comment about my fatness. I thought it was better to at least seem like I was aware of what was wrong with my body publicly, and I was still stinging from walking past a book in the library called ‘What’s Wrong With Being Fat?’ and a friend turning to me and saying, ‘There’s nothing wrong with it, is there Ally?’ So outside the science block I made a comment about my fatness, and my friend Edwina said something along the lines of ‘Oh I’ve never heard you say anything like that about your body before, you shouldn’t say anything like it again’. And I didn’t. I was 11 then and I am 22 now and I lived in fear of talking about my fat body, in case talking about it might draw somebody’s attention to it.

    About six months ago I was out for dinner at Sweet Mothers Kitchen (a restaurant in Wellington in New Zealand which you have to try if you get the chance, amazing gumbo and tacos and all the sweet stuff) and I was talking about fat acceptance, which I had gotten a vague idea of from posts on Jezebel, and it had totally started a seed in my brain of something wonderful and positive. I had put on a bit of extra weight making the transition from uni to desk job, and I was spending a lot of time hating on my body. Meg, a friend who I was out for dinner with, said she was going to send me an email with some links in it as soon as she got home. She did, and she sent me links to your blog, and to Fashion Hayley and to Kate Harding. I began to read, and I just couldn’t stop. A light bulb went on, if you will, and I started to read Obesity Timebomb and The Rotund, and Fatshionista, and Fat Heffalump and a whole lot of Fatshion blogs, like Fatshionable and Good Stuff Only, and all of a sudden I felt empowered and like I had the potential to be part of this big and awesome online community. I started my own blog, because I totally wanted my friends to know more about fat acceptance. I am really inspired to keep writing, and I can’t wait to go overseas and go to things like the Big Bum Jumble. Amazing!

    Using the word fat is still hard for me, because I am still trying to shake years of associating fat with ugly. But after reading all of these amazing blogs, using the word fat is feeling better than it has in years. I am still talking about it in round a bout ways, like raging about DimitySO doesn’t make bras above a size 16, and talking about always having to look for the extra large undies, and talking about buying things off ASOS Curve, and acknowledging my fatness online. It feels good. What I am really waiting for is to be heckled, and for someone to call me a ‘fat bitch’. I think I have spent my whole life being scared of being called a ‘fat bitch’, but now I think I have realised that I actually AM a fat bitch. And it is totally awesome. So bring it on sucka luckas! I am fat and it is great!

  • Nicole

    1. I love it! (And my 30th birthday is less than a month away!!!)
    2. nikkimay_99 at yahoo dot com
    3. I think it’s been kind of a process for me too – like a lot of the other commenters mentioned. I guess a major realization happened a few months ago when my husband and I were walking downtown after seeing a play, I
    was wearing a black spaghetti strap summer dress and as we were crossing a street someone from a group of frat guy types hollered that “you’re too fat for that dress”.

    I just smiled and kept walking – it didn’t bother me a bit! Having been in pride parades I’ve heard a lot nastier things that that yelled at me (AIDS is your fault, etc.)

    My husband was surprised that people would be so mean – but I wasn’t really surprised at all. People are mean for no reason all the time. What did surprised me was that I really wasn’t bothered at all.

    When we got to our destination – a restaurant – we sat down for a meal as planned (no sudden reactionary diets for me). Several times throughout the meal I thought of the incident trying to see how I really felt because I was so surprised that it didn’t hurt my feelings.

    It’s one thing to be able to say it yourself, it’s another to have the sting gone when someone else says it.

    I love your blog – thanks for being so awesome!

  • Annie

    Love it, would proudly wear it, especially around my small country town where I am either despised or pitied for “being fat” or called “Cute as a big round button” and “Don’t you look like Dawn French” (I do and she’s gorgeous but…).
    I just bought some “grunge” boots again (Chick o’ the 90’s like you) and am happily getting back in to dresses and cardis with my size 10’s proudly sticking out below…another reason for the stares hehehehhe.

    hullabaloobear@gmail.com

    Reclaimed the fat at work when someone was desperately, achingly, painfully trying to tell me I was fat but using other words. I looked him in the eye and said “I’m fat, it’s a good word, it is me, I like it. Don’t try and make out you’re all PC and whatnot, fat is my affirmation” He went away :D

    Cheers babe.

  • carol0ve

    1. what are you talking about!? I adore the necklace!
    2. carol_herrera23@yahoo.com
    3. The first time I reclaimed the word fat was when I made a tumblr account about a year ago. I never knew there was another world of fat acceptance online. I started off following you your blog and it branched out to tons of other beautiful fat blogs. I look at all you other beautiful girls and envy how beautiful your guys’ confidence is. I see a lot of my friends and family get so down on themselves about being fat and I wanted to be an inspiration to them that fat is just as beautiful, just like the the online community shows me.

  • I’m not entering for obvious reasons. But I still wanted to say FUCK YEAH you’re awesome and you wearing your own art makes you awesome times infinity. xo

  • Holy guacamole, even if I don’t win that amazing necklace, I am for sure going to have to buy one from your shop! It is so excellent! As are your boots, I am totally lusting after them. I don’t know if my creddy can handle an Evans shopping spree.

    I think that my journey to reclaim fat is totally still happening. I can remember being 11, and knowing that I was fat, and walking by the science block at school and making a comment about my fatness. I thought it was better to at least seem like I was aware of what was wrong with my body publicly, and I was still stinging from walking past a book in the library called ‘What’s Wrong With Being Fat?’ and a friend turning to me and saying, ‘There’s nothing wrong with it, is there Ally?’ So outside the science block I made a comment about my fatness, and my friend Edwina said something along the lines of ‘Oh I’ve never heard you say anything like that about your body before, you shouldn’t say anything like it again’. And I didn’t. I was 11 then and I am 22 now and I lived in fear of talking about my fat body, in case talking about it might draw somebody’s attention to it.

    About six months ago I was out for dinner at Sweet Mothers Kitchen (a restaurant in Wellington in New Zealand which you have to try if you get the chance, amazing gumbo and tacos and all the sweet stuff) and I was talking about fat acceptance, which I had gotten a vague idea of from posts on Jezebel, and it had totally started a seed in my brain of something wonderful and positive. I had put on a bit of extra weight making the transition from uni to desk job, and I was spending a lot of time hating on my body. Meg, a friend who I was out for dinner with, said she was going to send me an email with some links in it as soon as she got home. She did, and she sent me links to your blog, and to Fashion Hayley and to Kate Harding. I began to read, and I just couldn’t stop. A light bulb went on, if you will, and I started to read Obesity Timebomb and The Rotund, and Fatshionista, and Fat Heffalump and a whole lot of Fatshion blogs, like Fatshionable and Good Stuff Only, and all of a sudden I felt empowered and like I had the potential to be part of this big and awesome online community. I started my own blog, because I totally wanted my friends to know more about fat acceptance. I am really inspired to keep writing, and I can’t wait to go overseas and go to things like the Big Bum Jumble. Amazing!

    Using the word fat is still hard for me, because I am still trying to shake years of associating fat with ugly. But after reading all of these amazing blogs, using the word fat is feeling better than it has in years. I am still talking about it in round a bout ways, like raging about DimitySO doesn’t make bras above a size 16, and talking about always having to look for the extra large undies, and talking about buying things off ASOS Curve, and acknowledging my fatness online. It feels good. What I am really waiting for is to be heckled, and for someone to call me a ‘fat bitch’. I think I have spent my whole life being scared of being called a ‘fat bitch’, but now I think I have realised that I actually AM a fat bitch. And it is totally awesome. So bring it on sucka luckas! I am fat and it is great!

    Eek, my email is also alexandra.hazel.garrett@gmail.com

  • peachlette

    ummm, LOVE. love to bits and pieces.

    tulipsarepretty at gmail dot com

    for me, reclaiming the word fat is, as it is for many others, a journey. however, i’d have to say my journey officially kicked off in a big way when i decided to start a blog (not sharing the title because (a) i don’t want this to seem like i’m plugging my own stuff and (b) it’s still just for me and about 3 friends and family members). it was, quite possibly, one of the scariest things i’ve done in this lifetime (recognizing that my life is cush) – to actually type out the words “i am fat” and then hit “post.” holy eeeeeek-ness. I still am not in the space where I can tell just anyone on the street that i write about this stuff. for me, i started it because it became pretty obvious that i couldn’t continue to do my work with fat acceptance by myself; i needed the support of my loved ones but it required naming my fat instead of shoving it away or pretending it didn’t exist. it’s a work in progress and i love it!

    i’m buying one anyway, so i await their availability with all sorts of excitement!

  • Katrina

    I finally reclaimed “fat” about two or so years ago when I read this poem at a local open mic (some workmates were present too). It’s still a work in progress:

    Untitled

    Clinically it’s a fetish
    Drag from the Hefty Hideaway or Dress Barn
    There are a million reasons
    For why I am
    Molested at a tender age
    Raped at just fourteen
    When I eat my skin stretches
    Translucent like moth wings
    I’m big boned, with a thyroid itch
    That surgery or pills will fix
    Nip it in, tuck it down
    Truly the pea
    With the princess weight on me
    And starving myself
    Congratulate my success
    Or promise
    To eulogize at best
    But oh, I’m wicked and I’m lazy
    A picture of excess
    A perfect capitalist
    But socially, I’m a mess
    I’ve given in, and given up
    Take up too much space
    Took too big a piece
    I’m too loud, too proud
    Too in your face
    Will never win the race
    Oh, but such a pretty face
    …If only…
    The answers have laid the table
    But what would you rate
    The chances of survival?
    My world has shrunk around me
    And I’ve eaten myself to limits
    I’m easy and available
    Lay your head against my breast
    You secret advances won’t be rebuffed
    And I promise
    To stroke away the lashes
    Of acquiescence
    As your personal
    Ambassador to fat

  • 1. I really really love the necklace! It absolutely gives me life!
    2. In the tenth grade I began becoming more accepting of my curves, apparently my growing confidence was obvious to those around me because I was asked to produce and model in a scene for my school’s annual fashion show. It wasn’t until I came to the first meeting that I realized I was the ONLY plus sized person participating in the show. Instead of immediately backing out of the room I chose to stay & produce a Fat Girls Only scene. The scene was not only my first time on a stage but also all of the six girls in my scene as well. We took the stage,& the crowd by storm. In addition to
    a standing ovation and title Best Scene Overall. The weeks of preparation, did nothing to prepare me for the feeling I had as walked down that stage.

  • Shelby Marie.

    1. I love that necklace! It full of win! And fance!

    2. godshomemovies @ gmail dot come!

    3. I reclaim the word fat every single time I say it out loud in reference to myself, without apology, without sadness, without shame, without fear, without judgment. I reclaim the word fat when I look at my huge upper arms and my thunder thighs because I see the bodies of the women in my family reflected in my own. I smile to myself because they are strong arms and legs, defined by history and by generations of labor not by someone else’s definition of beautiful or acceptable. I reclaim the word fat when I open my eyes and my heart to the world by living in my body as it is and not hating it.

    4. I am a long time reader but a first time commenter. I am huge, huge fan of your art and design as well as your writing. You are an enormous inspiration, both artistically and in my own fat politics. Thanks so much for being awesome and true to yourself!

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